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It moved from October to December, but at least we still got the fight, the final to the Super Six Super Middleweight tournament, between British Carl Froch, the WBC champion, and undefeated American Andre Ward, the WBA Super champion.

After Ward announced his training injury that pushed the fight back two months, Froch’s team tore into Ward’s claims and called him unproffesinal. In general, it’s been mostly Froch, the 34 year old, who’s been doing the talking. With a 28-1 record, his reputation for producing entertaining fights, Froch feels confident enough to call out Ward on his style of boxing.

I’ve watched him fight on a couple of occasions. He’s not an exciting fighter to watch – he sort of fiddles his way through, he’s not a big puncher, he holds at any opportunity, uses his head. He’s a bit of a messer. It’s my job to make sure I put him on his back foot, and hit him hard and early. 

Nearly two weeks ago, it was Ward who spoke about Froch’s beahvior and demenor, reacting to accusations of intentional headbutting during fights – The guy I’m fighting is doing a little bit too much talking. He’s a very arrogant guy and really needs to be humbled. 

Ward doesn’t score too many knockouts, only 13 in his 24 fights, but Froch hasn’t won by knockout since 2009, beating Jermain Taylor by TKO. Since then it’s been decision wins and one loss to Mikkel Kessler. That doesn’t stop Froch from criticising Ward’s style, a style he knows how to handle and counter – I must let him know how serious I am, and how powerful I am. That might make him run and hold even more – and if it does, it’ll be to his detriment. He won’t score any points doing that against me. His friend Andre Dirrell tried that and he lost on points, pretty much disgracing himself. He’s going to have to engage, going to have to fight me at some stage because I’m going to be in front of him for 12 rounds, if necessary.