Luis Suarez

The media, the government; everyone seems to want a piece of Luis Suarez. Liverpool have got themselves a complicated person as their most talented player, but it doesn’t mean he isn’t worth the trouble. In a situation that is fixable with closer scrutiny and inner-criticism on his behavior, both sides can come out much stronger and better from recent events.

Because giving up on Suarez will be admitting that from their first year on the job, the American owners did nothing well, and leave Brendan Rodgers with an even more difficult mission in trying to rebuild Liverpool from a mid-table disappointment back to a team that challenges for things that are important.

Suarez is their best player, but Liverpool are not a one man team. Suarez isn’t the kind of player who forces a team to play only on and through him. The 6-0 win over Newcastle isn’t the perfect example, because basing your theory on one fact and one fact only is never a good idea. Yet Liverpool are a deeper, better team than they were in August and September, partially due to Brendan Rodgers slowly getting players to buy into his philosophy, partially due to the signings of Daniel Sturridge and Philippe Coutinho.

Building for next year has to be on the foundation of the current squad. Not another massive spending spree, which won’t happen anyway because Rodgers doesn’t have the allowance for it. He has a good enough squad, at least from the midfield upwards, to not need too many drastic changes in the next few months, hoping that Suarez is indeed not fed up with life in the Premier League.

Goalscorers, true, talented and dependable goalscorers are difficult to find. There are less than 10 world-class strikers with the ability to score and do more than that on the pitch every time they’re out there. Suarez is one of them. For a club that’s looking to find its way back in into the big kids table, losing a player like that, knowing he’s irreplaceable at the moment, is something they can’t afford to let happen.