Brady Hoke

There’s a chance the officials had something to do with Rutgers beating Michigan 26-24 and the Amarah Draboh catch that was ruled incomplete, but Brady Hoke remains someone fighting for his job without a chance of keeping it or making the football program any better. Maybe it’s not respectful, but keeping him any longer is just bad for both sides.

Hoke keeps insisting he isn’t thinking about not having a job come January. After almost four seasons of holding the Michigan Football team head coach position, as the program regresses each season under his charge, it’s getting harder and harder for him avoiding the questions, avoiding the distractions and sheltering his team from the notion that their head coach is something of a dead man walking in the college football world.

Michigan are now 0-2 in the Big Ten and 2-4 this season. They’ve lost in each of their games against Power Conference teams and Notre Dame. Their wins have come against a team in its first I-FBS season and Miami of Ohio. He’s benched a quarterback, criminally neglected one to an injury and a concussion although he and his AD have pinned it on the medical team and brought back the same quarterback he benched, getting another bad performance from him.

Michigan did have a shot at winning this game but it was a desperate field goal from 56 yards, and it was blocked as well. Maybe if Draboh’s catch on a 3rd and 8 would have been called as a legal reception, things would have looked different, but that wasn’t the case, even after review. It would have been simply delaying the inevitable. Michigan played badly against a Rutgers team that is in its first Big Ten season. This wasn’t the case of a win snatched away from their hands.

The Shane Morris scandal is behind him, but it doesn’t make his job any easier. Brady Hoke is still in charge of a football program that has been in a downward spiral for three consecutive seasons. He might be a Michigan man. Maybe he has simply made some mistakes. But a head coaching job making millions isn’t a charity role. He needs to do well, or show progress. It’s been a while since he has done any of these things. Keeping him as the head coach simply doesn’t make sense, and looks more like a stubborn persistence than clear thinking.

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