Spring training is now on for some of the teams around the league and we continue with our MLB stat lists, moving on to the pitchers 32 or younger who already have 100 wins in their career.

John Lackey

John Lackey

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The 31 year old rightie signed with the Boston Red Sox two months ago for just over 16 mil a year after eight seasons with the Angels, where he famously became only the second rookie pitcher to start and win a game 7 in a world series, beating the San Francisco Giants. Lackey has been a 10+ wins a season guy from pretty much the get go, with 2007 being his best – 19 wins and a 3.01 ERA, an AL best. His arrival at Boston might push Dice-K to the Bullpen. After 233 career starts, Lackey has a 102-71 record (40th among active pitchers) and a 3.81 ERA. He made the all-star in 2007.

Carlos Zambrano

Carlos Zambrano

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After a very disappointing 2009 for the Cubs and Zambrano, in which Big Z won only 9 games, his lowest production since 2002, the Venezuelan pitcher announced he will retire if 2010  will be the same. Hard to believe he’ll retire, and chances are his numbers will be back to where they normally are. Zambrano, 28, has a 105-68 record with a 3.51 ERA. He led the NL in wins with 16 in 2006. He won 18 in 2007, most in his career. He also became the first Cubs pitcher since 1972 to pitch a no hitter on September 14, 2008. He is also a three time all-star (2004, 2006 ,2008).

Brad Penny

Brad Penny

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Penny had a fantastic two year period in 2006-2007 while he was with the Dodgers, winning 16 games in each season, leading the NL in wins along with Zambrano in 2006. 2009 Didn’t go to well for Penny, as he started with the Red Sox but after going 0-4 he got chucked out of the rotation, leading to him signing with the Giants for the rest of 2009. He’ll start 2010 with the Cardinals. Penny has a 105-84 record with a 4.14 ERA. He won the world series with the Marlins in 2003 (2-0, 2.13 ERA) and a two time all-star (2006-2007).

Josh Beckett

Josh Beckett

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Beckett was also part of the 2003 World Series winning Florida Marlins team, winning the WS MVP after two stellar pitching performances against the Yankees. Beckett also won the 2007 ALCS MVP and his second World Series with the Red Sox. Beckett led the AL in wins in 2007 with 20 wins and has become one of the best in the league since moving to Boston. The 29 year old rightie has a 106-68 record with a 3.79 ERA. He has also made the all-star game twice (2007, 2009).

Jon Garland

Jon Garland

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After eight years with the Chicago White Sox, including a World Series win in 2005 and two 18 win seasons (2005-2006). After a disappointing 2007, Garland started moving around the west, first with the Angels in 2008 and a bad 2009 with the Dodgers and the Diamondbacks. The 30 year old will play for the Padres in 2010, carrying a 117-102 record with a 4.42 ERA. He was an all-star once, in 2005.

Johan Santana

Johan Santana

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Best pitcher in baseball? These last two years with the Mets have made me feel otherwise, but there’s no doubt Santana is among the MLB’s pitching elite. It’s still soon to tell how good he’ll be after the surgery he had at the end of last season, but the Mets’ hopes are in his throwing hands. Santana, 30, has a 122-60 record with a 3.13 ERA. He won the Cy Young award in 2004 and 2006 , winning the pitching triple crown in ’06. He’s been picked to the All-Star four times – 2004-2005, 2007, 2009.

Barry Zito

Barry Zito

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While he was with the A’s he was one of the best in the game, or at least one of the best second half of the season kind of pitcher, but since his move to the Giants from the A’s in 2007 for the highest contract ever awarded for a pitcher in MLB history he’s been average at best, with a 31-43 record since moving to San Fran. Zito won the Cy Young in 2002, with a 23-5 record and a 2.75 ERA. He made the all-star three times (2002, 2003, 2006) and 2009 seemed to be a bit of a bounce back year for Zito after a 2008 in which he got moved into the bullpen for a while, finishing with a 10-17 record.

Mark Buehrle

Mark Buehrle

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July 23, 2009, Buehrle became the 18th pitcher to throw a perfect game, two years after throwing a no-hitter against the Rangers. Buehrle also holds the record for most consecutive batters retired, with 45, following up his perfect game. He won the World Series with the White Sox, his only team since joining the majors in 2000, in 2005, made the all-star four times (2002, 2005-2006, 2009) and has pitched over 200 innings in each of his last nine seasons. His career stats: 135-97, 3.80 ERA.

CC Sabathia

CC Sabathia

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The highest paid pitcher in baseball history proved a lot of people wrong last year, winning the World Series with the Yankees after many people wagered on him not making it in the pin-stripes with the NY heat menacing him. His start in ’09 wasn’t exactly great, but like his team, his game picked up as the season progressed, with Sabathia finishing with a 19-8 record and 3.37 ERA, leading the AL in wins. Sabathia was good from the very start, 2001 for the Indians, but really elevated himself into one of the best in the game in 2007, winning the Cy Young and a year later after being traded to Milwaukee, leading the Brewers into the playoffs with an 11-2, 1.65 ERA stat sheet. The 29 year old is 136-81 in his career with a 3.62 ERA, making the all-star three times (2003,2004, 2007) and he won the 2009 ALCS MVP.

Roy Oswalt

Roy Oswalt

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With a career 137-70 record and a 3.23 ERA, putting aside his 2009 season, Oswalt has been one of the best in the league and maybe the best in the NL this past decade, winning 20 games in 2004 and 2005. He won the 2005 NLCS MVP and made the all-star three times (2005-2007) and is one of those pitchers that has suffered from a sub-par bullpen along the years, costing him quite a few wins along the years.

Roy Halladay

Roy Halladay

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After 11 and a bit seasons with the Blue Jays, with whom “Doc Halladay” won the 2003 Cy Young and making the all-star six times (2002-2003, 2005-2006, 2008-2009), leading the league in innings pitched three times and in wins once (2003, 22-7). He also won 20 games in 2008. Now he’s in Philly, and with (in my opinion) the best pitcher in the league joining their talented ranks, the Phillies are the big favorites to win the NL pennant. Halladay has a 148-76 record and a 3.43 ERA with 49 complete games, second among active pitchers (Smoltz, number one, is still a free agent).

Guys probably joining the club soon –

Vicente Padilla, LA Dodgers, 32, 98-85

Jake Peavy, Chicago White Sox, 28, 95-68

Jason Marquis, Washington Nationals, 31, 94-83

Cliff Lee, Seattle Mariners, 31, 90-52