Andre Iguodala 2013

One of the more coveted players in the 2013 NBA free agency period is undoubtedly Andre Iguodala, who has the Denver Nuggets trying to re-sign him, but also the Atlanta Hawks, Detroit Pistons, Golden State Warriors, New Orleans Pelicans and Sacramento Kings hoping to convince him to join them.

It seems Iguodala is planning on making his decision quickly, meeting with all of the teams in a very short period of time. Iguodala played just one season for the Nuggets on a $14.9 million contract. With nine NBA seasons in the bag and soon hitting 30, he knows that he might have to take a slight paycut, which means to something around $11-12 million a year, but his main concern is playing for a contending team.

The Nuggets seemed like one that’ll go deep in the postseason last year, finishing on an incredible strong ride with a franchise-record 57-25, but an injury to Danilo Gallinari and not matching up well with the Golden State Warriors thereafter led to a shocking first round exit, that also got George Karl fired.

According to Ty Lawson, Iguodala is making it quite clear he wants to stay.

He’s been working out up here. Normally, if you don’t want to go back to somewhere, you won’t go back at all. So, he’s been working out here. We’ll be in his top one or two. I still try and sell him on it. It was a hard sell when we didn’t have a GM or a coach, but now we do, so I’m going to be back at it again.

On paper, the Nuggets have a deep, complete team. No superstar, but a good mix of veterans and young players, with a capable sub or more at every position on the floor. Iguodala helped toughen up the team quite a bit last season, and the Nuggets need quite a lot of his wing-defending, even more than they do his offense (averaging 13 points and 5.4 assists last season).

In terms of contention? The Golden State Warriors can give him that. The rest of the teams lineup up to meet Iguodala can pay him more money than both the Warriors and the Nuggets, but aren’t likely to reach the playoffs next season, or go very far in them. Eventually, with the difference in contracts not being that big, the chances of winning could become the deciding factor.