Josh Howard

After playing for the Dallas Mavericks, Washington Wizards, Utah Jazz and Minnesota Timberwolves, Josh Howard knows there isn’t too much of a shot of him landing another NBA deal, especially with his rehab from yet another ACL tear still in progress, and he won’t be playing in 5-on-5’s until September.

The 10-year NBA veteran is no longer a threat from the outside, as no longer quick enough off the dribble to create his own shot. He’s a decent long-two, mid-range shooter, but that’s not enough to get a contract these days, especially when you’re 33 and with two torn ACLs in your past.

Howard averaged 6.7 points per game in 11 games last season for the Timberwolves, and hasn’t played more than 52 games in a season since 2007-2008, when he was averaging 19.9 points per game for the Mavs and was considered as one of the best small forwards in the NBA.

He used to be one of the most regarded perimeter defenders in the league, and there’s still quite a bit of defense he can give to a team, but as we mentioned – the facts and stats stack up against him. Injuries upon injuries for the last five years, and skills that might not be enough to warrant a minimum deal, even on the worst of NBA teams.

Howard is still planning to be ready for training camp, doesn’t matter for what team. He’s hoping that once he’s fully fit, he can work in enough workouts to prove there’s still room for him in the NBA, and that at 33, with a very limited skill set and maneuverability on the court, he can still find someone interested enough to add him.

Howard, the ACC player of the year in 2003 and a consensus All-American that season with Wake Forest made one NBA All-Star (in 2007), although at the time, during his best season in the league, there were many who thought he was needlessly snubbed from making a few more selections.

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