Patrick Robinson

The one season on the San Diego Chargers went pretty well for Patrick Robinson, and him hitting free agency comes with plenty of suitors, as the New York Giants, Chicago Bears, Miami Dolphins and Philadelphia Eagles are planning to make him an offer.

Basically, any team with some cap space and a need at cornerback is going after the 28-year old Robinson, who played sporadically for the New Orleans Saints from 2010 through 2014, before signing a one-year, $2 million deal with the Chargers. He played all 16 games for the Chargers, only the second time in his career that it’s happened. He did miss most of the 2013 season (played just two games) with a patella injury, but has bounced back from it, playing 30 games over the last two seasons.

Robinson finished with one interception (on opening day), 8 defended passes and 49 tackles last season. In his six NFL seasons Robinson has 10 interceptions, one of them returned for a touchdown. His career high in tackles is 64 during the 2012 season, when he started all 16 games for the Saints. He’s ranked as the fifth best cornerback hitting free agency by Pro Football Focus and basically, he’s an everyday starter on some teams, but generally, a very good addition to anyone as long as he doesn’t ask for too high of a raise, although Robinson is probably going to be looking for more years and money after kinda settling last season considering the demand for him now.

The Dolphins, who have already made some moves via trades, have been connected to a lot of free agents despite having $19 million in cap space, not leaving them with too much wiggle room, especially now that Maxwell is on the wage bill. The Giants with over $56 million to spend are contenders for pretty much anyone although their main focus is a defensive end. The Eagles, trimming their salary spending by trading away three players are strong players for a lot of players and need secondary help while the Bears will also try and keep Robinson from going back to San Diego thanks to more than $46 million in spending money.

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