Richard Sherman

Richard Sherman added two more interceptions to his impressive tally this season, now leading the NFL with 8. One of the more astonishing thing about his numbers happens to do with the very low amount of times quarterbacks actually try and get the ball to the receiver he’s covering.

No corner who has played at least 150 snaps has been targeted less frequently than Sherman, with quarterbacks throwing the ball in his direction only once every 9.2 snaps. He has now tied his interceptions number from last season, reaching 20 in his three-year career, putting him at 24th among active players.

Sherman doesn’t believe that you can call someone a great cornerback if he has low interception numbers. There are those who argue that the best way of measuring a corner isn’t by the amount of interceptions he finishes with, but by seeing how much he’s avoided. Sherman thinks that he’s a good receiver, but it has to come with interception numbers. Part of what makes him successful, according to Sherman himself, is being able to sell a story to a quarterback – trying to make it seem like he’s ill-positioned in his coverage of the wide receiver, pretty much setting a trap.

Sherman intercepted Carson Palmer twice (Palmer threw four interceptions in that game), but the Seahawks still lost. It probably won’t matter in the big picture of things, as they still should finish on top of the NFC West and with the #1 seed in the NFC.

Yes, Sherman is part of an elite defense, playing with who might also be the best in his position in the NFL, Earl Thomas, but that doesn’t take away from his exceptional reading ability and great hands, a combination that on most days makes him the toughest cornerback to play against in the NFL. Some people might not like him because he tends to speak his mind about pretty much everything, but that doesn’t take away from his ability on the field.