10 Biggest FCS Stadiums

Posted on 21 Mar, 2016, by in College Football

The FCS is almost like a different universe compared to the FBS, but it doesn’t mean that the lower level of football equals tiny stadiums. There are three non-NFL venues with a capacity of over 50,000, and interestingly enough, five of the top 10 belong to Ivy league teams like Yale, Harvard, Penn and Princeton.

The biggest stadium used regularly by an FCS team is LP Field in Nashville Tennessee (Tennessee State Tigers play there) but we decided just to mention it and not include it in our Top 10, a mistake we made in our G5 list and learned from it.

Bragg Memorial Stadium in Tallahassee, Florida

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A 25,500 seater and home to the Florida A&M Rattlers, it’s been open since 1957. Before it was built, the Rattlers played on a cow pasture south of the campus and then on a grass field, first known as Bragg Field located on a hill directly behind the current Gaither Gymnasium, where the present track and field complex is located. By 1980 it was no longer big enough for the program, and underwent major renovations in 1982 and 1983. They had an awful 2015, going 1-10. At home games the attendance shifts from around 10,000 to over 22,000 in the game against Delaware State, their only win this season.

Schoellkopf Field in Ithaca, New York

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The home of the Cornell Big Red football team, Schoellkopf Field has a capacity of 25,597, although when opened in 1915, it could hold up to 9000. Cornell surpassed 10,000 just once last season – opening week against Bucknell with 16,057 showing up. Their only win last season came at home against Columbia (a thrilling 3-0) with just over 3000 coming to see the spectacle.

Hornet Stadium (New ASU Stadium) in Montgomery, Alabama

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A brand new ground (opened in 2012) and home of the Alabama State Hornets, it has a capacity of 26,500 but there are plans of expanding it to 55,000 if necessary, with the design allowing it. Last season the finish against Miles brought 15,201, their best for 2015.

Princeton University Stadium in Princeton, New Jersey

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Home of Princeton Tigers football since 1988, it has a capacity of 27,773. It replaced Palmer stadium, and the exterior shell mirrors the layout of Palmer Stadium. Their record attendance last season (5-5) was 15,023 in a game against Lehigh.

Ace W. Mumford Stadium in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

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The Southern Jaguars play their football in this 29,000-seater (although more can fit in) which has been open since 1928. Southern went 6-3 in the SWAC last season, and their record attendance came in the Boombox Classic against Jackson State, beating the Tigers 50-31 in front of 30,194.

Dick Price Stadium in Norfolk, Virginia

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William “Dick” Price Stadium is home to the Norfolk State Spartans, and has a capacity of 30,000. It opened in 1997. The closest they came to filling it last season (4-7) was with 10,744 in attendance against Savannah State.

Harvard Stadium in Boston, Massachusetts

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Built in 1903, it was the first collegiate athletic stadium built in the United States. It’s home to the Harvard Crimson football team, and has a capacity of 30,323, although until 1951 the maximum capacity was over 57,000. Harvard went 9-1 last season, and their most attended home game was against Princeton, beating them in front of 17,444.

Franklin Field in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

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Franklin Field is the home of the Penn Quakers football team and has a capacity of 52,593, but serves a lot of other purposes. It’s also the oldest stadium in football, built in 1895, it was also the site of the nation’s first scoreboard. Going 7-3 in 2015, their most watched game was against Princeton on homecoming, with 11,017 showing up.

Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium in Jackson, Mississippi

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Jackson State play in the Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium, which can hold up to 60,492 fans in attendance. It was opened in 1950 and has served as the home in some games for Ole Miss, Mississippi State and Southern Miss while also hosting the Egg Bowl a number of times. In 2015 the Tigers played five home games, surpassing 20,000 twice. The record was 24,579 against Arkansas-Pline Bluff.

Yale Bowl in New Haven, Connecticut

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The biggest non-NFL stadium in the FCS (although it does have some NFL history with the New York Giants in the 1970’s), it’s home to the Yale Bulldogs football team. It has a capacity of 61,446, way down from the 70,000+ from 1914 to 1993. Yale playing Harvard there in 2015, the 132nd edition of The Game, brought in 52,126 fans.