Kaka Real Madrid

Maybe Kaka has finally found a way out of his disappointing Real Madrid tenure, with the club he grew up at, Sao Paulo, seem willing to pay quite a lot of money to bring him back and sorta rescue him from bench-oblivion.

According to Spanish Media Outlet Todox Deportes, Sao Paulo are bringing back Kaka for €15 million, as long as the former Ballon d’Or winner is willing to take a substantial cut in his wages. Kaka makes €9 million a season at Real Madrid,  and he’s signed until 2015. Sao Paulo can probably only offer him €3 million a season.

Kaka has played for Sao Paulo since the age of 8, featuring in 125 games for the clubs before being sold to AC Milan in 2003, for a fee of €8.5 million, which is probably one of the biggest steals of the previous decade considering Kaka’s contribution to Milan during his six seasons with the club, which include one Serie A title and a Champions League trophy.

At Real Madrid, his first season, until the injury, went pretty well, scoring 8 goals in the first 25 matches, but since then and especially since the arrival of Jose Mourinho, things changed. Kaka came mostly off the bench, often playing out of position, and was hardly used in matches against strong teams or in the later stages of the Champions League.

Real Madrid have been trying shopping him around, but the combination of asking for a transfer fee around €15-20 million while Kaka has been refusing to take a substantial paycut or make a move to a much lesser league (Russia or the Middle East) has hampered any chance of moving him for the benefit of both sides.

In Brazil, financial sporting groups help clubs finance these kind of transfers, although Sao Paulo are one of the better off clubs in Brazil. Kaka is worth quite a lot in Brazil in terms of merchandise and marketability, probably more than his current value in Europe. Even though it might mean a paycut, if he’s given upon his dream of succeeding for Real Madrid or remaining a substantial figure in European football (which he’s not at the moment), a return to Brazil isn’t such a bad choice.

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