Teddy Bridgewater

The Minnesota Vikings had a chance to cement their hold on the top spot in the NFC North. But there’s a certain way of life in that division, and it involves the Green Bay Packers, at least in the current dominant era of Aaron Rodgers, always coming out on top, even when they’re reeling from three consecutive losses.

The Vikings went into the game with a 7-2 record and five consecutive wins. One of the best defenses in the league and a running back that’s leading the league in rushing yards. It should have been a game that proclaims the Vikings are serious contenders, but it turned out to be another example of how the Packers always find a way to dominate this rivalry, and every other team in this division over the long run, and especially in the games that matter the most.

Adrian Peterson was held to just 45 yards, his second worst performance of the season on the ground. He did make it past the 1000 rushing mark, just like almost every other season in his career, but it was safe to say he wasn’t happy. The Packers have beaten the Vikings in 10 of their last 12 meetings, and Peterson has been around for most of those. He felt it’s time to shake things up, blaming the players and coaching staff at the same time for the loss.

I think it’s from the top to the bottom. It’s from the coaches on both sides and the players, as well. No matter what position we were in, we had calls, and we didn’t execute on a lot of plays. It came back to hurt us. But it’s the coaches’ job to put us in the best position, as well.

Did he go too far? Only if this results in some breakdown for the Vikings, who were handling things so well in Teddy Bridgewater’s (maybe injured) first full season as a starter. But if this is some sort of wake up call that rallies the troops and helps the Vikings build another impressive winning streak to finish the season and make the playoffs, no one will remember who or what Peterson was calling out.

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