Image: Source

Not really fair, not even close. The Wallabies got their bonus point in the first half already and Adam Ashley-Cooper scored three consecutive tries in the second half as the Americans withered away, looking like a helpless and a team without a plan, just crashing out miserably in the second half, en route to a 67-5 Australia win, their second of the World Cup.

Maybe it was their win over Russia, or maybe the noise advantage the Americans ahead prior to the match. Maybe it was Australia’s disappointing loss to Ireland, without scoring a try, that gave the Americans hope. In the first moments, it even looked close. Both teams looked disorganized, mishandling the ball numerous times. Quade Cooper looked like he never woke up from the Irish experience.

Well, 7 minutes later, Rob Horne scored the first try, and despite an American try from JJ Gagiano in the 22nd minute, making it 10-5, it wasn’t even close. Australia punished the United States for every turnover, with Cooper taking it up a notch with his passing and especially his decision making, while Kurtley Beale ran wild, scoring a try himself.

Second half? More of the same. Like we said, the United Stated looked like a team without a plan, just hoping to somehow find a gap or breakthrough opportunity the Aussies did not give them. Ireland were able to contain Australia and impose a very physical match through their brilliant scrumming and forward. The United States had no such size or physical strength advantage over the Wallabies, which meant their doom.

It was Adam Ashley-Cooper in the second half that destroyed the Eagles, scoring three tries. The half and match ended with a bad taste as Anthony Faingaa, scorer of two tries, laid motionless on the field after suffering a head injury, getting taken off the pitch. A huge win for Australia in terms of points and probably a nice confidence booster and stat buffer, but nothing much else. The American team, undisciplined and accurate through very little patches of the game, posed no challenge what so ever, nothing to learn or to draw from.