Tony Romo, Jason Garrett

A huge contract means similar expectations, and after three seasons without a postseason game, the pressure couldn’t be higher on Tony Romo and the Dallas Cowboys, who expect their franchise quarterback to take an example from Peyton Manning and start being a lot more involved in the offensive game, including when he’s off the field.

No one is complaining about Romo’s investment in the team and in practice, but in order for him to be better and for the Cowboys to finally stop fumbling their chances at the end of the season, the team wants Tony Romo to be the offense, and not just be a player who runs it.

What does this mean? Just like Peyton Manning did with the Indianapolis Colts after a few seasons, Romo will be involved in the play design along with Jason Garrett, Bill Callahan and other offensive coaches, which means there won’t be a play that wasn’t approved by him.

Everything will be tailored and fitted to his skills, preferences and understanding of the game. Maybe it’s a little bit risky, but when you pay this kind of money to a quarterback, saying to him you believe he’s the main reason you’ll be going anywhere in the next few seasons, you want him to do more than just show up on Sunday and hope he did his homework.

According to owner Jerry Jones, the bottom line is Romo being more involved in the finishing product. He’ll be spending more time than anyone at Valley Ranch, spending 12 hours a day from Monday to Saturday (figure of speech, I’m guessing) to make sure he’s running the best offense possible to help him bring out the best of him.

While no one thinks Romo is as good as Manning was at his best, or maybe even right now, the numbers over the last couple of seasons suggests he knows what he’s doing, despite the offensive line and running back problems. Maybe giving him more say in the matter of play-calling is the best thing the Cowboys can actually do.

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