Image: Source

Rafa. What a name, what a tale. After 25 years on this planet, after 10 years as a pro, with 10 Grand Slam titles, with one Olympic Gold Medal, Rafael Nadal, by tomorrow, will be the next athlete to have an Autobiography on the market, telling his story way before his career comes to an end.

What the F*&^?! With Nadal, despite winning the Roland Garros this year (sixth time), kind of struggling this season, especially when it comes to facing Novak Djokovic (losing to him five times in finals), I don’t think that an Autobiography is what we want from him. I’m sure his fans, even his most devoted ones, would prefer to see him regain some dominant streak and take back the world number one spot.

Sport autobiographies shouldn’t come what a player is in the middle of his career. They should come after he retires, or during the twilight of it at least. Players who use ghost writers or whatever to sit down with them and write their Autobiographies always come out boring. Yeah, there’s supposed to be some big part about how Nadal almost quit Tennis six years ago and turned to Golf.

Yeah, the part about his thoughts and views on the whole rivalry with Roger Federer is interesting. But I would’ve waited. Nadal, hopefully, has plenty of tennis and titles left in him. Lets say, 3 more dominant years? That deserves a mention in his book, right? What, if he passes Federer on the All Time Grand Slam win list he won’t need that on his resume or Autobiography? I highly doubt the world needs to Rafael Nadal books. Even one, especially at this point of his career, is too much.

In England, footballers are ready to write their Autobiographies before they win a title or hardly do anything. It’s a joke. It’s a messy and boring read nearly 100% of the time. Nadal doesn’t need the cash, I’m pretty sure. He’s made over 42 million dollars from tennis alone in his career. Rafa won’t change the life of anybody. Lets hope his performance at the US Open is better than his decision making regarding a unwarranted autobiography at the age of 25.