Lakers 2013

The most interesting take on this weird and probably disappointing season for the Los Angeles Lakers comes from redditor frekkld, who translated the 2012-2013 season into a synopsis of a Shakespearean tragedy, but the tales of Kobe Bryant, Dwight Howard and Mike D’Antoni seems to be more fitting to the world created by GRRM in A Song of Ice and Fire, or as most people know it, Game of Thrones.

Jerry Buss, who passed away this year, is the aging king who has a capable daughter, Jeanie. She’s the next in line, but passed over because she’s a woman, leaving the team in the hands of her less-competent brother Jim, who might be trying a little too hard to show he’s not his father, while not having the same kind of hard-life education his dad did to make him the successful man he became to be.

Phil Jackson is the aging general who retires after a great defeat knowing that his king is about to die and that the army is not the same as it once was. Kobe Bryant is a great knight who is mostly loved by the people, but is worrisome to many in the halls of power because of his rogue nature. Dwight Howard is a great knight from one of the southern kingdoms, the Atlanta Christians, but he’s injured and often-times too jovial for the likes of Sir Bryant, who’s as grizzled and war-tested as knights come.

As you expect, this goes on and on and is probably one of the more fun things you’ll read of a not too serious nature at the situation of the Lakers, which isn’t too bad thanks to the help of some referees. After the Kobe Bryant injury it seems it’s up to  Sir Howard the brute, Sir Gasol the Spaniard, Sir Metta the Loon and Sir Nash the Canadian to carry the war onward for their fallen leader Sir Bryant, who can only sit back with the generals and offer council, though it pains him to his core.

Is it going to be a happy ending, which only means an improbable NBA title for the Lakers in the end? And is a happy ending for the Lakers good for the rest of the league and its fans? Maybe it’ll end like GRRM promised for his own epic story – somewhat of a bittersweet ending, which is hard to define in NBA terms.

For the whole thing