The Winners of the Copa America

Posted on 14 Jun, 2011, by in Featured

1916

Champions – Uruguay (4 team group format with Argentina, Brazil and Chile). Argentina were the host nation. Uruguay’s Isabelino Gradin was the top scorer with 3 goals.

1917

Champions – Uruguay (2), and they were also the hosts. Angel Romano, also from Uruguay, topped the scoring charts with 4 goals.

1919

Champions – Brazil, also hosting the tournament. Arthur Friedenreich & Neco, both from Brazil, led the scoring charts with 4 goals.

1920

Champions – Uruguay (3), as Chile hosted the tournament for the first time. Jose Perez and Angel Romano (for the second time) led the scoring charts with 3 goals each.

1921

Champions – Argentina (2). This time five teams were invited, Paraguay being the newest side, but only 4 plays, as Chile withdrew from the competition. Julio Libonatti of Argentina topped the goal charts with 3.

1922

Champions – Brazil (2), hosting the tournament, the first with five teams playing. Argentina’s Francia topped the charts with 4 goals.

1923

Champions – Uruguay (4), also hosting the tournament. Chile withdrew from the tournament again. Argentina’s Aguirre and Uruguay’s Petrone led the scorers with 3 goals.

1924

Champions – Uruguay (5), also hosting the tournament. Brazil withdrew from the tournament. Uruguay’s Petrone was the top scorer again with 5 goals.

1925

Champions – Argentina (3), hosting the tournament. Both Chile and Uruguay did not play. Manuel Seoane of Argentina scored a tournament best six goals.

1926

Champions – Uruguay (6), as Chile hosted the tournament. Bolivia were invited for the first time as Brazil withdrew again. David Arellano of Chile led the scorers with 7 goals.

1927

Champions – Argentina (4), as Peru hosted the tournament and participated for the first time. Five different players scored 3 goals.

1929

Champions – Argentina (5), also hosting the event. Aurelio Gonzalez of Paraguay scored 5 goals to top the charts.

1935

Champions – Uruguay (7), with Peru hosting. Herminio Masantonio of Argentina scored 5 goals, the best scorer.

1937

Champions – Argentina (6), also hosting the event. Chile’s Raul Toro was the best scorer with 7 goals.

1939

Champions – Peru, their first win, hosting. Argentina and Brazil did not play. Peru’s Teodoro Fernandez was the top scorer with 7 goals.

1941

Champions – Argentina (7). Chile hosted the tournament. Juan Marvezzi of Argentina scored 5 goals, topping the charts.

1942

Champions – Uruguay (8), the host nation. For the first time seven nations participated. Argentinians Jose Manuel Moreno and Herminio Masantonio led the scorers with 7 goals.

1945

Champions – Argentina (7), with Chile hosting the tournament. Nortberto Mendez (Argentina) & Heleno de Freitas (Brazil) led the scoring charts with six goals.

 

1946

 

Champions – Argentina (8), also hosting the tournament.

Jose Maria Medina (Uruguay) was the top scorer with 7 goals.

1947

Champions – Argentina (9) in Ecuador, hosting the championship for the first time. Nicolas Falero (Uruguay) was the top scorer with 8 goals.

1949

Champions – Brazil (3), also hosting the tournament. Jair Rosa Pinto (Brazil) was the top scorer with nine goals.

1953

Champions – Paraguay for the first time. Peru were the hosts. Francisco Molina (Chile) led the scorers with eight goals.

1955

Champions – Argentina (10) with Chile hosting the tournament. Rodolfo Micheli (Argentina) scored 8 goals to win the scoring title.

1956

Champions – Uruguay (9), also hosting the tournament. Enrique Hormazabal (Chile) was the top scorer with 4 goals.

1957

Champions – Argentina (11), Peru hosting the championship. Humberto Mascho (Argentina) & Javier Ambrios (Uruguay) were the top scorers with 9 goals.

1959 (A)

Champions – Argentina (12), hosting the first tournament of the year. Pele (Brazil) was the top scorer with 8 goals.

1959 (B)

Champions – Uruguay (10), hosted by Ecuador. Jose Anfilippo (Argentina) led the scoring charts with 6 goals.

1963

Champions – Bolivia winning and hosting, their first and only win to date. Carlos Alberto Raffo of Ecuador led the scorers with six goals.

1967

Champions – Uruguay (11) hosted and won in the last edition of the South American Championship. Luis Artime was the top scorer with 5 goals.

1975

Champions – Peru (2) in a home and away style knockout tournament, beating Colombia in a best of three final series. Leopoldo Luque (Argentina) & Ernesto Diaz (Colombia) topped the scoring charts with 4 goals.

1979

Champions – Paraguay (2) beat Chile in the final. Jorge Peredo (Chile) & Eugenio Morel (Paraguay) were the top scorers with 4 goals.

1983

Champions – Uruguay (12) beat Brazil in the two leg final. Three players scored 3 goals were the top scorers of the tournament.

1987

Champions – Uruguay (13) beating Chile 1-0 in the final. Argentina hosted the tournament as it entered the system very similar to most big tournaments we know, with a group stage, Semi Final and one game Final match. Arnoldo Iguaran (Colombia) was the top scorer with 4 goals.

1989

Champions – Brazil (4), also hosting the tournament. Brazil beat Uruguay 1-0 in the final with a goal from Romario. Bebeto of Brazil topped the scoring charts with 6 goals.

1991

Champions – Argentina (13), with Chile being the hosts. This time there was no final match but a final group stage. Gabriel Batistuta (Argentina) was the best scorer with six goals.

1993

Champions – Argentina (14), hosted in Ecuador. It was Gabriel Batistuta with a brace winning the Copa for Argentina in a 2-1 win over Mexico in the final. Jose Luis Dolgetta (Venezuela) scored 4 goals, a tournament best.

1995

Champions – Uruguay (14), also hosting the tournament. Uruguay beat Brazil in the final after a penalty shootout. Batistuta and Mexico’s Luis Garcia were the best scorers with 4 goals.

1997

Champions – Brazil (5), hosted in Bolivia. Brazil beat Bolivia 3-1 in the final match. Luis Hernandez (Mexico) was the best scorer with 6 goals.

1999

Champions – Brazil (6) in Paraguay. Brazil crushed Uruguay in the final 3-0 with Rivaldo (2) and Ronaldo finding the net. The two of them were also the best scorers of the tournament with 5 goals.

2001

Champions – Colombia won their first title, hosting the Copa. Ivan Cordoba scored the only goal in the 1-0 win over Mexico in the final. Victor Aristizabal of Colombia was the best scorer with six goals.

2004

Champions – Brazil (7) won the tournament hosted by Peru. A fantastic and classic final between Argentina and Brazil ended in a 2-2 draw, with Adriano scoring a very late injury time equalizer before Brazil won the penalty shootout. Adriano was also the top scorer with 7 goals.

2007

Champions – Brazil (8) won their fourth title in five competitions, beating Argentina 3-0 in the final despite being considered slight underdogs. Robinho was the tournament’s top scorer with six goals.

2011

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Champions – Uruguay (15), winning their first title since 1995, beating Paraguay 3-0 in the final (goals from Luis Suarez and a brace from Diego Forlan). Tournament hosts Argentina were knocked out in the quarter finals. Paulo Guerrero of Peru was the top scorer with 5 goals, the first Peruvian top scorer in the tournament since 1939.