You can find beauty at almost every stadium across the wide variety offered in the world of college football if you look hard enough, but some places like Michie Stadium in West Point, Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge and Lane Stadium in Blacksburg, part of our top 10 best college football stadiums selection, make it easier to spot why they’re so special.

And because they’re so special, be it for the atmosphere in the stadium, the college town itself, the fans or simply how it’s built (some of us like architecture, you know) we want to make it easier on those who feel like visiting all of them (you don’t have to do it all in one season; take your time) with this map, to help you figure out how to make this special college football sightseeing tour work.

10. Sanford Stadium in Athens, Georgia

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The hedges, last planted in 1996, make Sanford Stadium, the home of the Georgia Bulldogs football team, look like a giant baseball ground. While the Bulldogs haven’t been great lately, it can get pretty special inside the 92,746-seater, like on ‘College Gameday’ in 2013 when they beat LSU 44-41 on a late touchdown pass Aaron Murray to Justin Scott-Wesley with a little over 1 minute to play.

9. Michie Stadium in West Point, New York

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The Army Black Knights football team plays in Michie Stadium, which means fans who attend the venue on the US Army military academy of West Point don’t get to see a lot of wins. What they do see is the beautiful setting right on the Hudson river, making it one of the more special spots in college football, rated as Sports Illustrated’s #3 sports venue of the 20th century.

8. Memorial Stadium in Clemson, South Carolina

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The first ‘Death Valley’ on our list is special mostly because of its fans and the colors. Home to the Clemson Tigers, Memorial Stadium is quite a sight to behold when 81,500 fans wearing orange pack the place, and provide one of the best and loudest atmospheres in American sports.

7. Lane Stadium in Blacksburg, Virginia

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Like in Clemson, the fans that pack Lane Stadium make it the special place that it is, that during the Hokies better days was often ranked as one of the more intimidating places for traveling teams to play in, as the rowdiness and noise level of Hokie fans can make it quite a formidable ally to the home team.

6. Beaver Stadium in University Park, Pennsylvania

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One of the more impressive sights in college football is a night game in Beaver Stadium, which turns into a town of its own on game day (106,572 capacity), is seeing this massive stadium packed with fans wearing nothing but white.

5. Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor, Michigan

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With a capacity of 107,601, it’s the biggest stadium in the United States. Home of the Michigan Wolverines football team, it’s also the second largest stadium in the world.

4. Kyle Field in College Station, Texas

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Thanks to the most coordinated fans in college football, Kyle Field is a great place to watch a football game not just for its magnificent sunsets but also for the people cheering for Texas A&M.

3. Ohio Stadium in Columbus, Ohio

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The Horseshoe, home of the Ohio State Buckeyes, is another one of the Big Ten monsters packing over 104,000 fans on gameday, and was actually added to the National Register of Historic Places by the National Park Service on March 22, 1974.

2. Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California

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The view of the San Gabriel mountains is only part of its charm. The history, the size, the special color of the field. It’s probably the most famous place in college football lore, which probably deserves a better team than UCLA using it as its home field.

1. Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

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Tiger Stadium ranks as the fifth largest “city” by population in the state of Louisiana when it’s packed with the loudest fans in college football, with a capacity of 102,321 since 2014. Like Clemson’s stadium, it’s also known as Death Valley, with opposition coaches like Bear Bryant and Mark Richt often noting how loud it gets inside there, especially when LSU are on a roll.