It’s been pretty widespread knowledge that Ganso isn’t happy with the terms offered to him by his club, Santos, making him look for a new team, in Brazil more likely than in Europe, with both Manchester United and AC Milan chasing the 22 year old Brazilian.

Ganso’s desire to leave the club isn’t anything new. At 22, after winning the Copa Libertadores and playing against Barcelona in the Club World Cup came the disillusionment period. When you’ve acheived everything you can at such a young age on the South American scene, it’s natural that your eyes start to turn elsewhere. Different challenges and more money. Ganso expected a huge offer from Santos to keep him, which he didn’t get.

Ganso rejected an offer worth £112,000 a month, but that may not be only his doing. About 55% of his economic rights are owned by DIS, a sport agency that might have an interest to move him elsewhere, primarily Internacional. These sport agencies usually fund a substantial part of players’ wages in Brazil, as the clubs can’t compete with the offers from Europe.

Ganso himself knows that a move to Europe is risky because of the chance that he won’t succeed, or lose some of his luster and more importantly, his place in the squad for the 2014 World Cup. You’d expect such a talented youngster to be a bit more confident in his abilities and chances to succeed on the biggest stages, but there’s’ a good a chance he doesn’t have much of a say in the matter. For DIS, it might be more profitable to keep him in Brazil.

After the 4-2 win over Gremio, Santos’ first league win of the season after eight matches, Ganso declared he’s played his final match for the club and is leaving. Delcir Sonda of DIS announced that his company are negotiating a full buyout with Santos, hoping to move him on to Internacional thereafter. But the European clubs have sensed the blood in the water, and will be knocking on his door in no time.

Alex Ferguson and Manchester United have expressed, rather discreetly, about their intentions to sign Ganso if the opportunity ever presents itself. AC Milan have also shown some interest, and have a bit more of history with past and current Brazilian players doing well for the club. Robinho was a Santos player himself, back in the day. But in the current footballing climate in Brazil, where sport agencies have more power than players and clubs, you never know what real interests are being sought after. Usually, it’s not about getting what’s the best for the player.